Pet Professional Guild

Should you bring your dog... just because you can?

Should you bring your dog... just because you can?

There are many reasons why people are bringing their dogs to more “human” events – it can be really fun to have your dog with you, for one! However, it’s important to learn how to read your dog’s subtle signs so that you aren’t unknowingly putting them in a situation that stresses them out.

Does your dog think you're boring?

Does your dog think you're boring?

A boring handler will not get the same results as a handler that is more animated and makes it a point to engage the dog during the training process. Read on for a few tips on how to be a bit more appealing to your canine companion.

Leash jerks do no favors.

Leash jerks do no favors.

Ever consider the anatomy of a dog’s neck? You have a thyroid, trachea, esophagus, lymph nodes, artery, vein, and cervical vertebra. Damage any of those and you could be looking not only a hefty vet bill, but you will likely have a dog in pain. Pain = not so great behavior = makes the behavior you were jerking the leash for worse

Contrary to the belief of some, leash jerks are not a viable option for training. Leash jerks are not conducive to training appropriate behavior, your timing had better be supernatural, behavior often gets worse, and you can cause extreme physical and psychological damage to the dog. For some dogs, being jerked on leash escalates the behavior you were trying to correct OR suppresses the behavior until Fido has had enough and perhaps enacts his frustration up the leash towards you or the other dog with you.

Choices for Dogs

Choices for Dogs

We control so many aspects of our dog’s lives from when they relieve themselves to when they eat. I suggest we make it a priority to give our dogs more choices in their daily lives when it is safe to do so. The results of giving a dog virtually no choices can range from frustration, loss of trust, boredom, shutdown, aggression or other behaviors that are not healthy or desirable.

Questions to ask yourself when training your dog

I would say, the first and foremost question to ask yourself when training a dog is “what do I want the dog to do?”. You need to narrow down what it is that you are wanting to teach the dog to do. Not everyone is going to want the same thing out of their dog, so it is important to ask this as both a trainer and as an owner.