positive reinforcement

Does your dog think you're boring?

Does your dog think you're boring?

A boring handler will not get the same results as a handler that is more animated and makes it a point to engage the dog during the training process. Read on for a few tips on how to be a bit more appealing to your canine companion.

Training Basics: Timing, Reward Marker, Reward Delivery

Training Basics: Timing, Reward Marker, Reward Delivery

Three simple training concepts that are worth explaining and greatly affect training. The timing of the reward marker and reward delivery are essential for training to be effective.

Simple, Effective Training Tips

Simple, Effective Training Tips

Humans and dogs are generally happier when there is clear communication about what is expected in terms of behavior.

New Year Dog

New Year Dog

Oftentimes when dogs are “behaving badly” in our eyes, it’s because they’ve not been taught an appropriate behavior and/or the behavior is rewarding for them. You must train behaviors in different contexts for it to transfer—she knows how to sit at home but not while out for a walk.

Secret Weapon(s) of +R Trainers

Secret Weapon(s) of +R Trainers

Recognizing what motivates a dog is mission critical for effective and successful training – oftentimes you have a secret weapon(s) at your disposal you aren’t even aware of. Every dog is an individual – with their own style of learning and motivation. The following refers to things that motivate a dog in a positive and pleasant way.

Leash jerks do no favors.

Leash jerks do no favors.

Ever consider the anatomy of a dog’s neck? You have a thyroid, trachea, esophagus, lymph nodes, artery, vein, and cervical vertebra. Damage any of those and you could be looking not only a hefty vet bill, but you will likely have a dog in pain. Pain = not so great behavior = makes the behavior you were jerking the leash for worse

Contrary to the belief of some, leash jerks are not a viable option for training. Leash jerks are not conducive to training appropriate behavior, your timing had better be supernatural, behavior often gets worse, and you can cause extreme physical and psychological damage to the dog. For some dogs, being jerked on leash escalates the behavior you were trying to correct OR suppresses the behavior until Fido has had enough and perhaps enacts his frustration up the leash towards you or the other dog with you.

Play to Train

Play to Train

If you only implement training during your typical sessions or out on walks, you are missing out on a major opportunity to improve reliability and impulse control.

Choices for Dogs

Choices for Dogs

We control so many aspects of our dog’s lives from when they relieve themselves to when they eat. I suggest we make it a priority to give our dogs more choices in their daily lives when it is safe to do so. The results of giving a dog virtually no choices can range from frustration, loss of trust, boredom, shutdown, aggression or other behaviors that are not healthy or desirable.

Set Your Dog Up for Success

Set Your Dog Up for Success

Adult dogs have emotional and cognitive developments that are similar to human toddlers, that’s according to Patricia McConnell, Ph.D.,a renown Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist (CAAB). Given this line of thought, I want you to really think about what the appropriate way would be to train a dog.

Do's and Don'ts of Recall Training

Do's and Don'ts of Recall Training

A solid recall with your dog does not happen by accident – it takes time, patience, and a strategy to teach the dog that coming to you when called = AMAZING things. Oftentimes, people poison their recall (aka spoiling the cue) by inadvertently teaching the dog that coming when called results in bad things).

Teaching an end of training session cue

Although I do not always cue the beginning of a training session, I always cue the end of a training session. Why do I always cue the end of a training session? By marking the end of a training session with a cue word, I let the dog know that work is over (although no dog that trains with me likely thinks of it as “work”!). Marking the end of a training session lets the dog know that training time is over and that he is no longer on the clock, so to speak.