positive dog training

Your Attitude Matters!

Your Attitude Matters!

If you’re having an off day, the likelihood of you being on point with training is not good. You’re at risk of getting frustrated and angry – two emotions that have no place in animal training and certainly don’t set the scene for patience.

The walk is for the dog

The walk is for the dog

The walk is for the dog, not for you. Yes, you read that correctly. I will likely ruffle some feathers with this one, but that’s fine with me.

What We Owe Our Human Clients

What We Owe Our Human Clients

If I make training an unpleasant experience for the human, the results will be lackluster at best. We owe it to our human clients to show them the same respect, compassion, and patience that we show the dogs.

Should you bring your dog... just because you can?

Should you bring your dog... just because you can?

There are many reasons why people are bringing their dogs to more “human” events – it can be really fun to have your dog with you, for one! However, it’s important to learn how to read your dog’s subtle signs so that you aren’t unknowingly putting them in a situation that stresses them out.

Does your dog think you're boring?

Does your dog think you're boring?

A boring handler will not get the same results as a handler that is more animated and makes it a point to engage the dog during the training process. Read on for a few tips on how to be a bit more appealing to your canine companion.

Have a K9 jumping bean?

Have a K9 jumping bean?

Dogs do what works for them and what gets reinforced, so look at how you are interacting with your dog and what you may be unconsciously encouraging and reinforcing.

Simple, Effective Training Tips

Simple, Effective Training Tips

Humans and dogs are generally happier when there is clear communication about what is expected in terms of behavior.

Training for Success

Training for Success

“Success builds confidence, confidence builds success.” A fellow trainer and dear friend, Mel Wilson of Canine Point of View in Jacksonville, shared that golden nugget of wisdom with me some time ago.

Failure is often the result of expecting too much, too soon from the dog. 

Better Walks Using a Series of Cues

Better Walks Using a Series of Cues

Why it’s important: By using cues in your dog has learned in a series, you can communicate with your dog while out in the world and reinforce good behavior in a fun way. This gives you the opportunity to teach the dog what is appropriate and also serves as an excellent way to redirect unwanted behaviors.

Make the Time to Train

Make the Time to Train

Before you get worked up and utter the old, “but I don’t have time!” line… consider that you have to let your dog out, feed your dog, walk your dog, hopefully play with your dog and otherwise interact with your dog multiple times throughout the day.

New Year Dog

New Year Dog

Oftentimes when dogs are “behaving badly” in our eyes, it’s because they’ve not been taught an appropriate behavior and/or the behavior is rewarding for them. You must train behaviors in different contexts for it to transfer—she knows how to sit at home but not while out for a walk.

Play to Train

Play to Train

If you only implement training during your typical sessions or out on walks, you are missing out on a major opportunity to improve reliability and impulse control.

Choices for Dogs

Choices for Dogs

We control so many aspects of our dog’s lives from when they relieve themselves to when they eat. I suggest we make it a priority to give our dogs more choices in their daily lives when it is safe to do so. The results of giving a dog virtually no choices can range from frustration, loss of trust, boredom, shutdown, aggression or other behaviors that are not healthy or desirable.

Poisoned Cue

Poisoned Cue

What is a “poisoned” cue? A poisoned cue is a cue that the dog has made a negative association with a cue. This is likely to happen when you decide to use punishment in your training. Your cue is no longer just a means of communicating to the dog what you’d it to do – it has become a sort of threat. This is just one more reason why punishment and aversive techniques are not a wise decision when it comes to training your dog. A poisoned cue cuts down on reliability and can sour your relationship with your dog.

Set Your Dog Up for Success

Set Your Dog Up for Success

Adult dogs have emotional and cognitive developments that are similar to human toddlers, that’s according to Patricia McConnell, Ph.D.,a renown Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist (CAAB). Given this line of thought, I want you to really think about what the appropriate way would be to train a dog.

Do's and Don'ts of Recall Training

Do's and Don'ts of Recall Training

A solid recall with your dog does not happen by accident – it takes time, patience, and a strategy to teach the dog that coming to you when called = AMAZING things. Oftentimes, people poison their recall (aka spoiling the cue) by inadvertently teaching the dog that coming when called results in bad things).

Dog Training Tips

Dog Training Tips

You get more of what you expect and reinforce, not necessarily what you want when it comes to dog training. You may very well be reinforcing your dog for the very behaviors that you don’t want. It is important to be aware of what your dog is doing but also what you are doing - you are sending all sorts of signals to your furry friend!

Teaching an end of training session cue

Although I do not always cue the beginning of a training session, I always cue the end of a training session. Why do I always cue the end of a training session? By marking the end of a training session with a cue word, I let the dog know that work is over (although no dog that trains with me likely thinks of it as “work”!). Marking the end of a training session lets the dog know that training time is over and that he is no longer on the clock, so to speak.