dog trainer

Secret Weapon(s) of +R Trainers

Secret Weapon(s) of +R Trainers

Recognizing what motivates a dog is mission critical for effective and successful training – oftentimes you have a secret weapon(s) at your disposal you aren’t even aware of. Every dog is an individual – with their own style of learning and motivation. The following refers to things that motivate a dog in a positive and pleasant way.

The Power of +R

The Power of +R

Angie heard about me through a friend I’d helped the friend work with a wild foster dog (he was truly a good dog, he just had no idea what behavior was expected of him!); the dog did a total 180 and is now happy with his forever family. But back to Angie and Babs.

Choices for Dogs

Choices for Dogs

We control so many aspects of our dog’s lives from when they relieve themselves to when they eat. I suggest we make it a priority to give our dogs more choices in their daily lives when it is safe to do so. The results of giving a dog virtually no choices can range from frustration, loss of trust, boredom, shutdown, aggression or other behaviors that are not healthy or desirable.

Poisoned Cue

Poisoned Cue

What is a “poisoned” cue? A poisoned cue is a cue that the dog has made a negative association with a cue. This is likely to happen when you decide to use punishment in your training. Your cue is no longer just a means of communicating to the dog what you’d it to do – it has become a sort of threat. This is just one more reason why punishment and aversive techniques are not a wise decision when it comes to training your dog. A poisoned cue cuts down on reliability and can sour your relationship with your dog.

Teaching an end of training session cue

Although I do not always cue the beginning of a training session, I always cue the end of a training session. Why do I always cue the end of a training session? By marking the end of a training session with a cue word, I let the dog know that work is over (although no dog that trains with me likely thinks of it as “work”!). Marking the end of a training session lets the dog know that training time is over and that he is no longer on the clock, so to speak.